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Habibia Soofie Saheb Badsha Peer Darbaar Musjid (Mosque). As soon as Hazrath Soofie Saheb arrived in Durban in 1895 he bought a piece of land on the northern banks of the Umgeni River in Riverside, a stone’s throw from the Indian Ocean, and built a humble wood and iron house. On this land he chose a spot, where the present Musjid stands, and laid the foundation immediately after Juma Salaah. A few members from the community, including Sayed Fakroodeen, Rooknoodeen and Jhetam were present. The main builder was an Italian.

When the Musjid, was completed, it was also used as a Madressa until 1903, when a Parsee by the name of Rustomjee, at his own expense, built a madressa. An orphanage (Yateemkhana) was then built to house the orphans and destitutes. A portion of the northerly end of the land was used as a cemetery, and adjoining this piece of ground an old age home was built. Next to the orphanage was a kitchen and a place with ablution facilities. At the entrance to the Darbar, a Musafirkhana was built to cater for travellers and wayfarers. An Ashurkhana was also erected here. Durban. KwaZulu Natal. South Africa.

Habibia Soofie Saheb Badsha Peer Darbaar Musjid (Mosque). As soon as Hazrath Soofie Saheb arrived in Durban in 1895 he bought a piece of land on the northern banks of the Umgeni River in Riverside, a stone’s throw from the Indian Ocean, and built a humble wood and iron house. On this land he chose a spot, where the present Musjid stands, and laid the foundation immediately after Juma Salaah. A few members from the community, including Sayed Fakroodeen, Rooknoodeen and Jhetam were present. The main builder was an Italian.

When the Musjid, was completed, it was also used as a Madressa until 1903, when a Parsee by the name of Rustomjee, at his own expense, built a madressa. An orphanage (Yateemkhana) was then built to house the orphans and destitutes. A portion of the northerly end of the land was used as a cemetery, and adjoining this piece of ground an old age home was built. Next to the orphanage was a kitchen and a place with ablution facilities. At the entrance to the Darbar, a Musafirkhana was built to cater for travellers and wayfarers. An Ashurkhana was also erected here. Durban. KwaZulu Natal. South Africa.

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